EXHIBITION OPENING

James V. Hatch and Camille Billops, c. 1970. From the Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives, Rose Library, Emory University

James V. Hatch and Camille Billops, c. 1970. From the Camille Billops and James V. Hatch Archives, Rose Library, Emory University

“Still Raising Hell: The Art, Archives, and Activism of Camille Billops and James V. Hatch” Exhibition
Thursday, September 15, 2016
Emory University

As artists, activists, and collectors, Billops and Hatch have been raising hell for more than 50 years—elevating public consciousness around “isms” that have shaped American culture, politics, and identities. Since 2002 the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library has been home to the comprehensive collection—playscripts, photographs, works of art, and more—of these two leading stewards of African American history. As artists, activists, and collectors, Billops and Hatch have been raising hell for more than 50 years—elevating public consciousness around “isms” that have shaped American culture, politics, and identities. Since 2002 the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library has been home to the comprehensive collection—playscripts, photographs, works of art, and more—of these two leading stewards of African American history.

A special exhibition was curated by Dr. Pellom McDaniels from Emory University that features the incomparable Billops/Hatch collection of material culture housed at Emory University in its African American Collections and the Stuart A. Rose MARBL (Manuscripts and Rare Books Library), which has a strong focus on the arts.